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Colt McCoy Teaming Up With Caredox To Help Schools Track Concussions

Redskins quarterback Colt McCoy knows about the dangers of concussions, an injury he suffered in December of 2011.

Here's McCoy describing the hit as a member of the Browns in his Player's Tribune article from March:

"Late in my second season, I was the starter and we were playing against the Steelers. In the fourth quarter, I took a shot to the helmet from James Harrison and suffered a bad concussion. I went back into the game, and I shouldn't have. I couldn't even stand the lights in the postgame press conference. They felt like knives in my head. For several weeks, I had a lot of bad symptoms. Sensitivity to just about everything and these awful headaches. There was plenty of controversy surrounding how the team handled it and how I handled it. I figured I would recover, and move forward as the Browns starting quarterback the following season."

Five years laters, McCoy has teamed up with Caredox, a program designed to manage sports related injuries and concussions, and spent some time at the company's facility in Texas to discuss his involvement.

"We play a violent sport, so I don't think there's a time and place where we're ever going to completely take injuries or concussions out of the game. But figuring out a way to keep it safe, keep it manageable," he said.

Caredox "works with top national researchers, including Harvard, to study school health using anonymous trend data. Schools and parents who participate in our free platform help advance the study of asthma, allergies, concussions, disease outbreaks and other childhood health issues," says its website.

With more schools switching over to electronic medical records, Caredox hopes it can become a long-term resource to track concussions so that coaches and doctors have an easier decision-making process when it comes to injuries during games and practice.

"I think working with Caredox like I am now is just bringing that awareness to the table," McCoy said. "It's allowing parents, teachers, coaches, athletic directors to all be on the same page."

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